I couldn’t stop at kimchi, so I decided to pickle some Brussels sprouts I had sitting in the fridge. I added a carrot, a bunch of garlic, a shiitake mushroom, some mustard seed, coriander, and red pepper flakes, and a bay leaf.

This isn’t a vinegar pickle, it’s a live lactic acid ferment. The vegetables are in a 5% w/w salt solution, and will ferment at room temperature for about a week. This is actually my first brine ferment, and I didn’t use a recipe, so hopefully it works out! It’s based roughly on the traditional technique for making pickled cucumbers, which are called sour pickles in contrast to the new-fangled vinegar kind.

I couldn’t stop at kimchi, so I decided to pickle some Brussels sprouts I had sitting in the fridge. I added a carrot, a bunch of garlic, a shiitake mushroom, some mustard seed, coriander, and red pepper flakes, and a bay leaf.

This isn’t a vinegar pickle, it’s a live lactic acid ferment. The vegetables are in a 5% w/w salt solution, and will ferment at room temperature for about a week. This is actually my first brine ferment, and I didn’t use a recipe, so hopefully it works out! It’s based roughly on the traditional technique for making pickled cucumbers, which are called sour pickles in contrast to the new-fangled vinegar kind.

Two litres of fresh kimchi. One week until deliciousness. I love fermentation!
This cost me about $5 in vegetables.
Recipe from Serious Eats. I multiplied it by 2.5 because that was how big my cabbage was, and I added some kohlrabi. Oh, also I cut the cabbage into bite-sized pieces; I’ve tried it with whole leaves, and it’s hard to eat.

Two litres of fresh kimchi. One week until deliciousness. I love fermentation!

This cost me about $5 in vegetables.

Recipe from Serious Eats. I multiplied it by 2.5 because that was how big my cabbage was, and I added some kohlrabi. Oh, also I cut the cabbage into bite-sized pieces; I’ve tried it with whole leaves, and it’s hard to eat.

Hey Tumblr! It’s been forever. Here’s some delicious food I made and ate today. You know you missed it.

In this post, we have: delicious vegetables, sourdough pasta (!!), my new knife and cutting board being beautiful, and my new-ish camera being a boss. If you’re curious, the knife is a nakiri, a japanese vegetable cleaver. The board is by Proteak, and it’s SO HUGE. I can finally cut everything I need for a meal on one board without transferring things to bowls. It’s amazing. The camera is a Canon 6D with EF 16-40 F4L lens, and I promise to use it for things other than taking pictures of my dinner.

Recipe: let’s call this “Chorizo Primavera

Notes: I made this up as I went, so all measurements and times are approximate. If things seem to be cooking too fast or not fast enough, trust your judgement and adjust accordingly. The pasta (with oil) or the topping can wait off the heat for the other to finish.

Time: 20-30 minutes. Serves: 2-3

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb. pasta (I used radiatori, but rotini or fusili would work well)
  • Olive oil
  • 1 large vegan chorizo sausage (about 170 g or 6 oz)
  • 1/4 lb. mushrooms, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large bell pepper (I used 3 minis), sliced into strips
  • 1/2 bunch kale, coarsely chopped
  • 3 large cloves garlic, minced

Directions

  1. Prepare all ingredients in advance. Start boiling water for pasta.
  2. When water boils, begin heating a heavy-bottomed pan on medium-high heat. Cook pasta according to package directions while proceeding with the rest of the recipe.
  3. Add a tablespoon of olive oil to the empty pan. When the oil starts to shimmer, add the chorizo and break apart.
  4. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 2-4 minutes until both ingredients start to brown.
  5. Add bell pepper strips and half the garlic and sauté for a minute. Add the kale and the rest of the garlic, turn down to medium heat, and stir frequently until the pasta is done.
  6. Drain the pasta, return to the pan or a serving bowl, and toss with another tablespoon of olive oil. Top with the remaining ingredients and serve.

A Vegan Doctor Addresses Soy Myths and Misinformation

This is the best summary of this topic I’ve seen to date. If you have any doubts about eating soy, check it out!

Non-natives must be able to position ourselves as active and integral participants in a decolonization movement for political liberation, social transformation, renewed cultural kinships and the development of an economic system that serves rather than threatens our collective life on this planet. Decolonization is as much a process as a goal. It requires a profound recentring on Indigenous worldviews. Syed Hussan, a Toronto-based activist, states: ‘Decolonization is a dramatic reimagining of relationships with land, people and the state. Much of this requires study. It requires conversation. It is a practice; it is an unlearning.’
excerpt from “Decolonizing together”, a great piece about moving “beyond a politics of solidarity toward a practice of decolonization” by Harsha Walia for Briarpatch Magazine.  (via fracturedland)

This is my very belated acknowledgement of Vegan Pizza Day, which was celebrated for the second time on June 30, 2012. These delicious pizzas were, in fact, consumed on June 30 - I’m just late in posting them.

The first is a simple, greasy, delicious deep dish pizza topped with tomato sauce, red peppers, and heaps of Daiya mozzarella. The dough recipe is from The New Best Recipe, a book by the makers of America’s Test Kitchen and Cook’s Illustrated Magazine. The book is definitely not vegan, but this is hands down the best pizza dough I’ve ever made. The secret is mashed potato!

The second is a much healthier but still slightly sinful pie with a standard crust, tomato sauce, kale, red peppers, and mushrooms, smothered with cheesy sauce and parmesan sprinkles from the Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook. The cheese sauce should have been added after baking - it got a little dry in the oven.

Vegan apple fritters! They tasted as good as they looked. Better, maybe.

Recipe from All Hail Seitan.

Chickpea “tuna” melt with Daiya mozzarella, from Vegan Junk Food. My favourite from this book so far. Delicious!

Tofu scramble with chard; skillet-roasted potatoes with garden-fresh rosemary. Recipes from Vegan Brunch.

Tofu scramble with chard; skillet-roasted potatoes with garden-fresh rosemary. Recipes from Vegan Brunch.

Lunch today is some lasagne I made this weekend. Cashew ricotta, almond parmesan, Daiya mozzarella, and fresh chard, beet greens, and mustard greens. I think it’s safe to say this ranks among the best lasagne I’ve made. Recipe cobbled together from the Veganomicon, the Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook, and the stuff I had in my fridge and garden.

Lunch today is some lasagne I made this weekend. Cashew ricotta, almond parmesan, Daiya mozzarella, and fresh chard, beet greens, and mustard greens. I think it’s safe to say this ranks among the best lasagne I’ve made. Recipe cobbled together from the Veganomicon, the Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook, and the stuff I had in my fridge and garden.